Category Archives: News & Reviews

OneDice Bundle

OneDice-UniversalI just wanted to let you folks know that there’s a new Bundle of Holding out there. For the next 20 days you can get a collection of OneDice games from Cakebread & Walton for about $16 and support Doctors Without Borders at the same time, since 10% of your payment (after fees) goes directly to them. What I like about the OneDice roleplaying games is that there’s basically one game for every genre imaginable (ok, perhaps not for all of those, but it’s close) and the rules are pretty easy to learn. I should probably also mention that all the games of the OneDice line are family-friendly. If you’re looking for a simple roleplaying game to play with your kids or a game you could run while you’re main game is on hiatus, OneDice is probably a good choice. All the books are also standalone, which means all the core rules are included in each genre book.

The so-called Starter Collection ($7.95 or more) contains OneDice Universal (Revised), OneDice Fantasy and Urban Fantasy, OneDice Cyberpunk and Steampunk, and OneDice Pulp. If you pay more than the threshold price you get all of the above in addition to OneDice Space, OneDice Pirates & Dragons, OneDice Airship Pirates, OneDice Supers, OneDice B-Movies and last but not least OneDice Robin Hood.

After the purchase you can download all these books in PDF format DRM-free and they are also automatically added to your DriveThruRPG account. By the way, if you want to have a look at the rules first before making a purchase, there’s a OneDice Quickstart available as PWYW. It’s a 44-paged PDF containing not only the rules, but also solo adventures in a fantasy and scifi setting respectively.

#RPGaDay2018 – Day 3: What gives a game “staying power”?

Welcome to Day 3 #RPGaDay2018, we’re here to stay!

The question for today is: What gives a game “staying power”?

I’m going to tackle the topic from two perspectives in the videos, the game as the experience shared by players when they play, and the game as a game line you buy through books and supplements. Here are the videos…

In English for Sunglar’s Musings:

Continue reading #RPGaDay2018 – Day 3: What gives a game “staying power”?

Making Monsters

I have been away for the past two weeks touring Iceland. Iceland is a country with a rich mythology of trolls, elves (the hidden people), viking sagas including berserkers, sorcery and witchcraft. It is a great place for getting inspiration as a GM.

I have also spent my holiday reading the complete works of H P Lovecraft. The Icelandic summer is the best time to read these if you are a wuss like me as it never gets dark.

Over the past two weeks I have written five adventures but for every one of them I have created new monsters. That is  a really odd thing to do as nearly every well established game has volume after volume of monsters. Why do I need yet more or feel that none of the five thousand monsters I have at my disposal are quite right?

The adventures I have written are, first and foremost, for my long standing group and will probably slot into the campaign after they complete their current adventure. I say probably as I am not a railroading GM and if they don’t take the bait then they could easily miss all of these adventures.

These adventures are also the ones I intend to submit to ICE for The Adventurers Guild. I would like to have played through them at least once before submitting them to the editor.

So why make new monsters?

I think the combination of the Lovecraftian influences and the Icelandic  mythology have created a set of adventures that need the perfect monster but also it needs a monster, or a better word would be foe, that the players do not know down to the last statistic, how tough it to kill, how dangerous it is in a fight and how to defeat it. Familiarity breeds contempt as the cliche says.

I left the monster building until I came home, I didn’t take a computer on holiday with me or rule books. I could check the odd rule here or there using the PDF rules on my phone but it was very liberating to just write the description of the creatures I wanted as I wanted them to be rather than be constrained by what was in the books.

The common factor is of course that rules play no part in the whole creation process. I can always ‘fix’ the rules afterwards. In this case it is just monsters. In this context rules equates to constraints and creativity and constraints are never easy bedfellows.