Category Archives: RPG

I Don’t Feel Like Writing

Ok, I guess it’s ironic to start a new blog post with a title like this, but I wanted to keep you folks informed about what’s brewing behind the scenes at Stargazer’s World.

To be honest there’s not much happening at the moment. The whole situation with the pandemic is probably taking its toll. I am still playing irregularly but some of my gaming groups are on hold until we can meet in person again. I have acquired a couple of new and exciting games, and backed a few Kickstarters, but I haven’t had the time to give everything a closer look.

I had some plans for running a new campaign, but they haven’t really materialized since I either couldn’t make up my mind what I really want to run, or the opportunity hasn’t presented itself yet. During these times getting a group of players together has become harder especially if you’re not willing to recruit random people from the internet.

I also had some bouts of depression during the last months which really didn’t make things easier. Luckily I feel pretty fine right now. I’ll also be able to take a few days off later this month which I’ll probably spend either reading or playing some video games.

I’m pretty sure the writing itch will come back sooner than later, but at the moment I really don’t feel like writing. I know I don’t owe anyone an explanation, but I still wanted to give my dear readers an update. Take care and stay healthy!

The Crux With Established Settings From Movies, Games And Novels

Who doesn’t know this? You’ve just played through a video game, watched a movie or read a novel thinking this might make great source material for a roleplaying game. In fact some of the most beloved tabletop roleplaying games are based on established franchises like Star Trek, Star Wars, Lord of the Rings, just to name a few. But they are definitely some issues when trying to bring these settings to the game table.

I recently played the critically-acclaimed Horizon: Zero Dawn. Aside from the exciting story, the gorgeous graphics and the impressive soundtrack, I fell in love with the world building. I immediately thought this might make a great setting for a tabletop game. There’s actually enough depth to make this work, BUT there’s one elephant in the room that needs to be addressed.

In the game you play as Aloy who is eventually on a mission to save the world. As with many of these stories, Aloy is basically “the Chosen One” and only she can unearth what happened in the past and prevent that history repeats itself. If you try to come up with cool adventures for a party of adventurers in a tabletop RPG version of the setting, you immediately have to struggle with the fact, that you’ll probably never match the experience of the video game.

There have been several cool Lord of the Rings roleplaying games, but whatever you can come up with, your party of characters will never rival the deeds performed by the Fellowship of the Ring. Sure, you can run successful games in the Middle Earth setting, but you have to be content with either ignoring canon or running adventures which don’t interfere with the established history.

I fully understand that a GM can truly make a world their own. You can ignore canon, let a party of characters take Aloy’s place, have someone else carry the One Ring to Mt. Doom, and who says it was Luke Skywalker who destroyed the first Death Star? But that’s not what many people want or even enjoy. Personally I always have to struggle with myself when I plan to ignore canon in a roleplaying game.

Star Wars and Star Trek actually fare a little bit better than many other settings because even though the protagonists in the movies and TV series have quite some impact on the setting at large, there are eras and many places who have never been explored in detail. But even then there are many people who don’t want to play second fiddle to Han Solo or Jean-Luc Picard.

In my opinion good roleplaying game settings don’t have larger-than-life heroes aside from the player characters themselves. They should be the ones whose deeds change the world for better or for worse. They should be the focus of their own stories, not some NPC in control of the GM. That’s actually one of the reasons why I am not too fond of the Forgotten Realms. It’s one example of a roleplaying game setting with far too many extremely powerful NPCs running around and taking the limelight away from the player characters.

Will all this make me stop thinking about converting established settings? Probably not. Even though I know it usually doesn’t work that well, it’s just too tempting. Especially since there’s always hope that someone who likes the source material might get interested in the roleplaying games hobby. But in the future I’ll probably think twice before putting too much work into such an endeavor.

What is your stance on the subject? Do you think I am totally in the wrong here, or do my arguments have some merit? Please share your thoughts in the comment section below!

Bundle Of Holding: Fudge

I have had a soft spot for the Fudge roleplaying game system for quite some time now. Unfortunately several classic Fudge games including the 10th anniversary edition have never been released in digital form. Until now!

Grey Ghost Press has teamed up with the Bundle of Holding team to bring us an awesome bundle containing the best Fudge has to offer. The starter collection ($12.95) includes the following:

  • Fudge 10th Anniversary Edition
  • Psi-punk
  • Hack-n-Slash
  • The Orb
  • Survival of the Able

If you pay more than the threshold price of $25.47 you get all of the above plus the following:

  • The Deryni Adventure Game
  • Terra Incognita
  • Now Playing
  • The Unexplained

If you are a fan of Fudge or just curious what this system has to offer, I highly recommend checking out this Bundle of Holding. And if you are still on the fence, why don’t you check out our posts about Fudge here on the blog?