Category Archives: Freebies

First Look: Simple Fantasy Adventure

Retro-clones are all the rage nowadays but most of the games from that category are based on the grand-daddy of all RPGs: Dungeons & Dragons. Recently a few retro-clones of other games have appeared including Zweihänder which is heavily inspired by the original Warhammer Fantasy Roleplaying Game.

Today I want to write about Simple Fantasy Adventure by my friend Audrey Grace Winter. It’s a modern simulacrum of LOR, Iron Crown Enterprise’s “Lord of the Rings Adventure Game” which was itself a simplified version of MERP (Middle Earth Role Playing) which was based on Rolemaster. Since LOR was heavily steeped in Tolkien’s lore, Audrey decided to take out all the protected IP, and split the character archetypes into race and class which can be freely chosen by the players.

Simple Fantasy Adventure comes in the form of a very beautifully laid out, 18-paged, free PDF. Instead of the game it’s based on, it doesn’t come with its own setting, but is meant both as a modern recreation of this classic ruleset, as well as a simple generic system for use with your own world.

Character creation in SFA is a simple process of picking a race and a class. After that you get to distribute 6 points among your character’s Attribute (Strength, Dexterity, Intelligence, Wisdom, Speed) and Skill Characteristics (Physical, Subterfuge, Arcana, Melee, Ranged, Defense, and Vitality) within some restrictions. For example you can’t put any points into Vitality and only two among the Attributee.

The available races are humans, elves, halflings and dwarves. Each race gets a bonus and a penalty to differentiate it from the other races. From their descriptions and abilities the races definitely have a Tolkienesque feel which is probably no surprise given the fact that SFA is a clone of LOR.

The available classes are fighters, rogues, rangers and mages. Classes provide bonuses to skills and determine a character’s starting Vitality points. If you have played LOR in the past you may have noticed that SFA deviates from LOR in a couple of aspects, but these changes were mostly made to keep the lawyers at bay. Mechanically SFA and LOR are pretty close, but SFA has definitely a clearer presentation.

SFA’s standard task resolution mechanic is pretty simple. The GM sets a target number (like 4 for routine tasks, 8 for moderate ones, or 18 for truly epic feats), the player rolls 2d6 and adds the relevant characteristic. If the result is equal or higher than the target number, the character succeeds. Simple, but efficient.

SFA’s lineage back to Rolemaster shows in its Combat Chart. When attacking you take the attackers attack skill (Melee or Ranged), roll 2d6 and look up the result on the chart. A number denotes the amount of damage caused by the attack, while C or C+ are critical hits. A critical (C) causes your roll result plus 10 damage, while a “double critical” (C+) causes twice the damage of a regular critical.

SFA includes a small number of magic spells and GMs are encouraged to create their own. Unlike D&D’s Vancian magic, mages in SFA can cast as often as they like, but each spell causes Drain which is damage. So a mage can easily knock themselves out by casting too many spells. The spells included are also not as flashy as in other games (like D&D for example). This fits very well with the feel of the game its based on.

Even though SFA is only 18 pages long, it is a complete game with all rules needed to play, including an extensive bestiary, a handful of pre-generated characters, and a list of common equipment.

The big question remains: is it worth your time? In my opinion it is. It’s a rules-light game, written with new players in mind, and with an undeniable charm. It’s also totally free and released under a Creative Commons license, so you are allowed to create your own material based of SFA as long as you share your work freely under the same license. Regardless whether you’re looking for just a simple game to try out or if you’re actually a fan of the game SFA is based on, I recommend you give it a closer look. You won’t be disappointed!

The Siege Perilous

If you are even remotely interested in the Ultima series of computer roleplaying games and D&D you owe it to yourself to check out Michael Shorten’s excellent “The Siege Perilous” rules.

Back in 2009 he took Swords & Wizardry Whitebox to create his vision of a Ultima pen & paper roleplaying game loosely based on the first three games in the series. The Siege Perilous consists of a 46-paged core rulebook, a 54-paged GM’s guide, and a 10-paged gazetteer which unfortunately he never finished.

One thing that makes The Siege Perilous special is its interesting approach to classes. At character creation you can pick between the classes of Fighter, Magic-User, Cleric and Thief – quite standard so far. But at level three you can either stick to one of the base classes or switch to one of the advanced classes like the Alchemist, the Lark, or the Paladin. Sure, advanced classes like this are nothing new to D&D in general, but I haven’t seen the concept in OD&D-based games before.

The playable races in The Siege Perilous are pretty standard as well, which is no surprise since the Ultima series was originally based on the creator’s own D&D campaign, but how they work mechanically is quite different. Humans for example do get an Intelligence bonus in the early Ultima games and so is the case in Michael’s tabletop game.

Another change from D&D is that The Siege Perilous throws out Vancian magic and replaces it by a spell-point based magic system complete with Ultima-inspired spells. The deeper I delve into this game the more excited I am about it. The Siege Perilous combines two of my favorite things into a perfect blend.

Oh, by the way, did I mention that the rules also include space combat? No? The early Ultima games like many other CRPGs of that era often combined fantasy settings with SF elements. Ultima 2’s story for example heavily relied on time travel. In Ultima 1 you eventually got access to Scifi equipment like blaster weapons, aircars and even space shuttles. From how I understand things these artifacts are left-overs from an ancient civilization. Perhaps Sosaria is actually a post-apocalyptic setting. 

Overall I think The Siege Perilous is a great example for a White Box-based game which tries to do something different. While it’s still D&D at its core, it’s also a totally different beast. I also think that some of the ideas of early computer roleplaying games can still be exciting to explore even today. So do yourself a favor, and check out The Siege Perilous!