Quick and Easy Friends

I am all in favour of an easy life. Although I have never played 5e it [D&D] hasn’t changed that much in past 40+ years that I cannot look at a stat block and think I know what that does.

One of the things that I don’t like having to make up on the fly when gaming is NPCs. There is always the danger that the players seek out an NPC early in a game session and before you know it you have been playing them for 3-4hrs and you have no stats or details.

Books of NPCs are always useful and the more detail the better. One of the most popular Rolemaster books was Heroes and Rogues that detailed 24 NPCs at 7 different levels complete with backstories.

Rolemaster NPCs are not much use to most people. 5e NPCs are far more accessible because, in my circles at least, D&D is a bit of a common background. If you are playing any regular fantasy rpg it will not take a great deal of effort to convert from 5e to your favourite rules. For many people of course 5e is their favourite rules. I have heard that a lot of people play it.

This week I found The Friend Folio by Sean Van Damme and Elizabeth Kost. The book details fully worked ‘sidekick’ NPCs. They are pretty much drop in and ready to go. The book contains 20 sidekicks and is very well presented (see below).

Dwyn'Du example card

Now, I don’t know what a Shadar-kai Expert is, but I don’t need to know. I can pick that bard up and run with it/him without having to fall back on improvising something and then having to pick my notes apart after the session to build the character.

I have been gaming with the same group for 36 years now. This means that a) they know most of the stereotypes I come up with when I have to improvise and b) they know the Heroes and Rogues NPCs because they have either met them or used them themselves over the past three decades.

This set gives me a whole new set of personalities to play with.

Domains Horror

It is impossible to hang out with TTRPG designers, follow them on twitter or any social media and escape a near barrage of Kickstarter campaigns. Some are eagerly awaited and there is a flood of advocacy as people get excited about new books and games. Others are indie developers trying not to look desperate to get the minimal funding to make their game a reality.

Then there are the few who are doing things differently.

Domains is a horror genre game written by FIlip Lončar under the Ordoalea imprint.

FIlip Lončar cannot do a kickstarter campaign, to put it simply they just are not allowed in Croatia. Instead the game is out on DrivethrRPG with a full explanation of the situation.

In addition there is a record for the total earnings and the total that needs to be earned. At the time of writing that stood at 13% of a €3000 total.

This ‘everything laid bare’ approach appeals to me. It is not a kickstarter but it has the same functionality. If anything it is more like an IndieGoGo campaign as Kickstarters are all or nothing whereas IGG allow a partial successoption.

I really hope you will check out the Domains page before reading the rest of this post or directly afterwards.

When I did I had a few questions so I made contact with Fllip over Twitter and then email.

Here is a bit of our conversation, with Fllip’s permission.

Peter: What made you start writing Domains Horror?

Fllip: Honestly I wanted a good horror game. I never knew what kind of game I was looking for until I played a few narrative games and realised that NARRATIVE games ARE the way to do horror. Horror is all about the feeling, the story. And narrative games work with that. As no narrative game had the “right amount of crunch” I decided to make my own.

Peter: What makes the system stand out?

Fllip: Well the fact that it’s a ttrpg, but it shares a lot of things with narrative and pure storytelling games. I tried intertwining the core resolution mechanic with the narrative parts of the game.

Peter: It makes a change to read about a horror game that doesn’t mention Lovecraft or Vampires, is there a central ‘evil’ behind Domains?

Fllip: Well there is. But as Domains is a Horror Roleplaying System, it’s intended to create any kind of Darkness (the evil you mentioned) yourself. Meaning that this is a framework that you can use to create a Lovecraftian story, or even a Sci-Fi horror where the evil is in fact corporate greed. Everything is possible with this framework. Well some homebrewing and hacking required.
But all in all the game DOES lean towards Lovecraftian horror, while it’s not stated that way.

Peter: You have used a phrase I am not familiar with. You say the GM section advice enhances the possibility of bleed. What does that mean?

Fllip: Well BLEED refers to the transfer of emotions and feelings from the character to the player. Basically it’s all about making the player empathize with the character. THAT is what gets you scared. The realisation that the game feels so mundane and everyday that it could happen to you.

Peter: I see you also have a light OSR game. Is Domains your biggest project so far?

Fllip: Well the light OSR game was a test of my writing skills primary as I constrained myself to ONLY 2 pages. But so far Domains IS the biggest game that I have made public. I do have a few other games in planning (Shambler, Falling Star Isles, and a few more).

Peter: What does the future hold for the Domains system?

Fllip: Well for the future? I’m planning a few Domain books (settings), an Advanced Rulebook (more options, and a few more “frameworks”, like item creation, and other things to allow people to tailor make their experience with the game), and maybe a few Story books (campaigns). But the biggest thing I think will be in the future is the Open Domain Licence. Which will allow others to make their own Domains based stuff!

Peter: Is Role Playing big in Croatia?

Fllip: Not sure. In my town it’s about… Erm… 15 people playing? In total in the country I would say it’s about 2k players. So not so big IMHO. But it’s on a steady rise due to Critical Role and other game streams.

You can follow Fllip by following the Ordoalea Publishing twitter account https://twitter.com/OrdoaleaP.

If you like horror role playing and you like narrative games then I hope you will check out Domains and at the moment it is discounted to $5.52. That is not a lot to spend to support an indie developer that is trying to overcome obstacles that most of us take for granted.

Guest Post: Combat of the Thirty

Handling chivalry in RPGs is hard. Genre fiction loves chivalry and honor almost as much as it loves jaded pessimism – and it often shoves the two philosophies together in ways that seem to clash. The classic example is the paladin and the rogue. How’s a GM supposed to have both in the same party without one of them (usually the paladin) looking like a moron? A real-life incident from 1351 may help shed some light on how to walk this tightrope.

The Hundred Years’ War between England and France (1337-1453) was a famously awful mess. Millions died, countless towns were burned (sometimes multiple times), and the whole affair settled remarkably little. Yet the leadership of both sides were ostensibly bound by the laws of chivalry, which theoretically ought to have limited the violence. It’s a great example of how honorable combat usually doesn’t hold up in the real world. Yet amid the blood and the grime, there was a bright spot: the Combat of the Thirty, an example of chivalry held up for centuries to come.

In 1351, an English castellan (lord of a castle) in Brittany was riding past a fortress occupied by Breton forces fighting for France. When he saw that no one inside the castle was going to come out and fight, the Englishman called up to the Bretons on the ramparts to ask if there was anyone inside who might want to joust with him “for the love of their ladies”. The joust he was proposing was no tournament game, but a deadly bout with steel-tipped lances!

The Bretons politely declined, but offered a counterproposal. “We will choose twenty or thirty of our companions in the garrison and we will go to an open field, and there we will fight as long as we can endure it; and let God give the victory to the better of us.” The two sides agreed on a date and time, then parted.

The day of the combat, both sides arrived with thirty men-at-arms. The fighters didn’t pair off or anything: it was just a giant scrum of two teams of thirty men trying to kill each other. They fought mounted and afoot, with swords, daggers, spears, and axes. The fighting lasted for hours. Over a dozen people died. The French side ultimately won, but literally all the combatants who survived were badly wounded.

The outcome had no impact on the broader course of the war. Indeed, it wasn’t intended to. This was sixty guys getting together to beat the stuffing out of each other for no other reason than the joy of combat and the glory they would earn for living up to a chivalric ideal.

And glory they did earn! In the context of the era, what these sixty combatants did was the pinnacle of chivalric achievement, made grander still by the backdrop of an incredibly un-chivalric war. More than twenty years later, a French historian recorded that one of the combatants still held a place of unique honor at the court of King Charles V specifically because of the knight’s participation in the Combat of the Thirty. Ironically, though King Charles may have valued chivalry highly, his successes in the Hundred Years’ War were arguably due to his unchivalrous pragmatism.

The central takeaway from the Combat of the Thirty is this: your campaign doesn’t have to be tonally consistent to be believable. Even in the midst of a hideously unchivalrous period in Western history, chivalrous acts still occurred. At your table, you can have your Jedi behave honorably and your bounty hunter be ruthlessly pragmatic and give both a decent shot at success.

The most fun campaigns support a diversity of PC worldviews. If you’re playing Song of Ice and Fire Roleplay, you can have an idealistic Brienne-type PC and a nihilistic Sandor Clegane-type PC in the same party without ever determining which one of them is ‘right’ about how the world works. Indeed, it’s more fun if you don’t. A campaign with a single underlying philosophy strikes only a single note. A campaign that strikes many notes doesn’t get old as quickly – and it has a little more tension too.

The Combat of the Thirty shows us that a campaign with only a single worldview isn’t realistic. And experience shows us it’s less fun.

For more RPG content grounded in real-world history and folklore, head over to the Molten Sulfur Blog, where Tristan publishes adventure hooks, adventure sites, and NPCs every Tuesday.

All quotes are from the Chroniques of the 14th-century historian Jean Froissart.

A Roleplaying Games blog

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