Happy Ending

A couple of years ago I ran a handful of posts about creating a game based upon playing cards.

At the time I just thrashed out the core rules.

In the next update I shared links to a playtest of a functional game.

Now two years after those first posts the game has not only completed its play test but I also ran a successful crowdfunding campaign for it and the final game has been released as both PDF and physical books.

What prompted this post was an email I received this morning. The content was a nice piece of feedback from a GM running the game with his group. He was not only running the game but he also shared the first house rule that they had developed.

It is one thing to write a game. Anyone can do that. It is easy to self publish, again anyone can do that. Seeing your work in print is quite cool but all it takes is a bit of software for the layout and €10 to order a set of print proofs. It is knowing that people are playing, enjoying and making the game their own that made it all worthwhile.

If it hadn’t been for this blog I don’t know if I would have ever come up with the ideas, or if I had, I am not sure I would have developed it into a working game.

So if you fancy trying something new over Christmas, you could do worse than checking out Devil’s Staircase Wild West.

Genesys and the End of the Year

Although I have been reading various roleplaying games during the last months, I irregularly direct my attention towards Genesys, FFG’s generic roleplaying game based on the mechanics popularized by their Star Wars RPGs. I’ve played in a very successful and fun Edge of the Empire campaign and over the many, many sessions I learned to love the system. Usually I am no fan of fancy dice, but the Narrative Dice system just works great!

This time my excitement for Genesys was rekindled by the release of the Expanded Player’s Guide, which not only contains new gear, new spells, new vehicles for the players, but also a lot of GM material, including new example settings. Genesys is simple enough that I easily could see myself running a game with just minor prep, but it also has enough depth to keep players excited for quite some time.

Many GMs have that one, go-to game, which they use both for one-shots and lengthy campaigns, a game they can run at a moment’s notice. I never had such a game. I’ve run many games in the past, but I was never that comfortable with a system. It’s probably part of my “GM’s attention deficit disorder”. Nevertheless, I think Genesys could become such a system.

Traditionally I have run a one-shot game (usually something from the horror genre) for my friends on New Year’s Eve and this time I’m tempted to use Genesys for that. That means I have about two weeks to read the rules again, come up with a viable idea and prepare an adventure. We’ll see how this turns out considering I’ll be in food coma all over the holidays…

Lazy Friday Video Post – Adam Koebel's First Look At Bastionland

Yesterday I watched Adam Koebel’s (of Dungeon World fame) video about Chris McDowall’s Electric Bastionland which is currently being kickstarted. Even though I was already quite excited about the game, I couldn’t help but smile while watching the video. Adam Koebel’s excitement for the game is quite palpable and very contagious. It was a joy seeing him discover all the quirky ideas and brilliant concepts.

Even though I’ve already seen various playtest versions of the game, I hadn’t seen all “failed careers” yet – and they are brilliant! If you are still unsure whether Bastionland is for you, I highly recommend watching the video, which I embedded into this post. Enjoy!

A Roleplaying Games blog

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