Kickstarter: “Making History: Three One-Session RPGs”

Back in 2010, about a month after I finished writing WR&M I visited GenCon in Indianapolis. There a fellow RPG fan called Tristan Zimmerman did an interview with me for his RPG podcast. Now, almost 9 years later he’s running a Kickstarter campaign for his own roleplaying games!

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If you ever wanted to run a game in a historical setting but didn’t have the time for all the prep and research involved, Tristan has you covered. “Making History: Three One-Session RPGs” contains three complete games including pregenerated characters and adventures set into three eras of play. There’s “Norse Ivory”, a game in which you play Normans in 994 A.D. on a quest to the lands of their Viking ancestors. In “A Killing in Cahokia”  you take on the roles of Native Americans investigating a murder and conspiracy in a Native American metropolis long before white men came to American shores. Last but not least there’s “Darken Ship”, a modern day game in which you play low-ranking US Navy sailors alone in a ship which should carry a crew of thousands.

The Kickstarter started today and has a goal of $1500. The game is already finished in digital form, but he needs help to finance a print run. Tristan has graciously provided me with a copy of the game and it looks very cool. All three games sound very intriguing (I am especially excited about the one set in Cahokia), the rules are fairly easy  and I’m sure you could use all three games to introduce your friends to the hobby, or run it as a convention or similar event. Each game also comes with reading recommendations in case you want to learn more about the adventures’ subjects.

If you are into historical RPGs and/or a game which you can use to introduce the hobby to new people, you definitely should check out Tristan’s Kickstarter!

Recommendation: Kestrel Investigates

I guess Monday is a good day for off-topic posts. But what I am about to share with you, is just too awesome. I recently stumbled upon a web series called “Kestrel Investigates” about a British paranormal investigator called Agravain Kestrel and his elusive cameraman Mike. At first glance it might look like just another shaky paranormal investigation video blog on YouTube, but instead it’s a very British satire of the genre. In my opinion it’s brilliant!

Two series have been released at this point, and series three is currently being worked on. I have enjoyed every single episode tremendously and I can’t wait to see how the story of Agravain and Mike continues after the cliffhanger ending of the second series!

And to give this post some RPG-related spin, you can watch it as inspiration for the “The Unexplained” tabletop RPG. You can check out my review of said game here.

Let’s talk Minecraft

Yes, I know. This is a tabletop roleplaying game blog, not a computer game one. But it’s also still my personal blog, so I guess a small detour from our regular content is in order.

Minecraft is a game that I started playing pretty early. I guess it was still in an alpha phase back in the day. The game was simple but allowed for a lot of creativity. The survival aspects added a sense of urgency and danger to the game and eventually the game also got a proper ending with “The End”.

But Minecraft became much more interesting for me with mods. Nowadays there are countless mods for single and multiplayer. Mods that add creatures, new machines, new mechanics, different world generation, and much, much more. These days I prefer to turn Minecraft into a more peaceful, constructive experience by playing modpacks focusing on technology and machines.

Instead of being a survival game, Minecraft becomes a game about building machines and complex logistical systems. My wife for example is more interested in building cool houses and creating elaborate farms, so we recently decided to build a modpack suited for both our play styles (and there’s also a small side project more focused on technology). I also started a dedicated blog about my Minecraft shenanigans. If you’re interested to learn more, I recommend you check it out.

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So why Minecraft? And why now? Minecraft helps me to be creative. I can easily create things in game. A lot of the gameplay is about building stuff after all. Other creative endeavors of mine weren’t so successful lately, so this is definitely a good thing.

So, let’s now return to our regular program. Winking smile

A Roleplaying Games blog

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